The PCHS dragon through the decades

By Jared Olar
Library assistant

It’s on the logo of the Pekin Police Department and it’s the school symbol and sports mascot of Pekin Community High School – a red dragon. How did the high school and the police department come to choose a dragon as logo and mascot?

The reason for the choice of a dragon is rooted in the city’s name, which, as we’ve discussed here before, is an older “Anglicized” form of Peking or Beijing, China’s ancient imperial city and modern capital. In origin our city’s dragon logo is the representation of a wingless Chinese dragon (or “lung”) – although the PCHS dragon’s form has varied greatly through the decades.

Pekin’s having been named in 1830 after China’s capital soon gave rise to a tradition of fanciful association with different aspects of Chinese culture. Thus, Pekin residents very early on took to calling their home “the Celestial City.” Later on Pekin’s professional minor league baseball team in the early 1900s was called the Celestials, and the old downtown Pekin Theater was decorated as a Chinese pagoda. Local businesses often used Chinese themes and written Chinese characters in their advertisements.

This tradition of fanciful association with China does not appear in Pekin high school’s earliest “Pekinian” yearbooks, but by the 1920s the occasional or rare drawing of someone or something Chinese begins to appear in the high school yearbook.

It wasn’t until 1937 that the classic PCHS logo of a Chinese wingless lung first appeared in the Pekinian. In that year and over the next few years the same logo was printed on the front cover of the yearbook. The same dragon logo also would be embossed on the high school gymnasium floor and painted on the side of PCHS buildings. This is the same period when the high school adopted “the Chinks” – an old colloquial and sometimes disparaging American slang term for Chinese persons – as the school symbol and team mascot.

Pekin Community High School’s official logo, featuring the school’s seal over a wingless Chinese “lung,” made its debut on the cover of the Class of 1937’s graduation yearbook.

For a few years in the 1940s, the PCHS dragon disappeared from the high school yearbook, but it reappeared on the cover and inside pages of the 1948 Pekinian. The 1948 Pekin yearbook depicted a traditional Chinese dragon, but one with small wings. The following year, a pencil sketch of a scene reminiscent of traditional Chinese art was printed in the yearbook – central to the scene was a large Chinese lung flying through the sky. Other Chinese-themed pencil sketches are found throughout the 1949 Pekinian.

The cover of the 1950 Pekinian, however, departed from the classical Chinese dragon tradition, instead featuring more of a cartoon-style European winged dragon. The class ring that year featured the same dragon representation as on the yearbook’s cover.

The PCHS dragon usually was not featured in or on the cover of yearbooks during the 1950s, but the dragon began to appear more frequently in the 1960s. It was in the 1965 Pekinian that Pekin’s long established tradition of Chinese-themed fancy reached its apotheosis. Not only did the yearbook feature the high school’s traditional Chinese dragon logo, but the cover drawing featured Chinese bamboo window blinds, and the sections of the yearbook were organized and titled according to traditional Confucian social classes. The yearbook staff perhaps had pulled out all stops that year to celebrate Pekin’s 1964 high school basketball state championship.

Four years later, the Pekin dragon reappeared on the 1969 yearbook cover as a classic Chinese lung within a gold-embossed medallion. The 1970 and 1972 yearbook covers had the same dragon in a gold medallion. Only once more in the 1970s – in 1975 – did the PCHS dragon appear on the yearbook cover. That year it was a photograph of the old school logo painted on the side of a high school building.

Chinese themes grew more and more rare in the Pekinian during that decade, and during that time Chinese Americans visited Pekin to express their great offense at the use of “Chinks” as a team name, asking the school to choose a different mascot. The great majority of high school students and alumni favored keeping the name, but in 1980 District 303 Superintendent Jim Elliott decided, despite opposition, to retire the “Chinks” mascot permanently. He retained the Pekin dragon, however, and the cover of the 1981 Pekinian sported a photograph of the new PCHS dragon mascot costume at a basketball game.

The 1981 Pekinian was the first PCHS yearbook after the school mascot was changed from “the Chink” to “the Dragon.” The yearbook cover sported a photograph of the new mascot.

In the 37 years since then, the PCHS dragon has frequently appeared in and on the cover of the yearbook – but as a rule he takes the form of a classic European fire-breathing winged dragon, not a Chinese lung. The old school logo of the Chinese lung – which debuted on the cover of the 1937 Pekinian – may still be seen at the school and the stadium, and even appeared on the one of the pages of the 2011 Pekinian. This year’s Pekinian cover shows a European dragon amidst flames.

The cover of the 2017 Pekinian features a fiery European-style dragon rather than a classic Chinese “lung.”

Below is an extensive gallery of images showing examples of the PCHS dragon through the decades:

Pekin Community High School’s official logo, featuring the school’s seal over a wingless Chinese “lung,” made its debut on the cover of the Class of 1937’s graduation yearbook.

After being absent from the yearbook for most of the 1940s, the Pekin dragon returned in 1948 — but that year the Pekin dragon, while still recognizably Chinese in style, grew a pair of small wings.

Shown is a detail from a large charcoal-sketched drawing from the 1949 Pekinian, presenting a landscape scene with a flying Chinese lung done in the style of traditional Chinese drawings. Smaller details cropped from the same drawing appeared throughout the 1949 Pekinian.

This page from the 1949 Pekinian shows the high school cheerleaders posing around the PCHS dragon logo on the floor of the old West Campus gymnasium. At the bottom left are the high school’s old racially insensitive “Chink” and “Chinklette” mascots.

The Pekin dragon on the cover of the 1950 Pekinian again sports wings and is drawn more in a cartoon style, resembling a European dragon more than a Chinese lung. The same image was used for the 1950 PCHS class ring.

This page from the 1950 Pekinian shows the old scoreboard at the Pekin high school stadium, featuring the wingless Chinese lung from the school’s official logo. The current scoreboard also features the school’s wingless Chinese dragon.

In the 1965 Pekinian, Pekin’s long established tradition of Chinese-themed fancy reached its apotheosis. On the cover, the high school’s traditional Chinese dragon logo reappeared after a long absence from the yearbook, but this time the cover drawing featured Chinese bamboo window blinds, and the sections of the yearbook were organized and titled according to traditional Confucian social classes. The yearbook staff perhaps had pulled out all stops that year to celebrate Pekin’s 1964 high school basketball state championship.

Shown is the cover of the 1969 Pekinian. Both that year and in 1970, and again in 1972, the yearbook cover sported a classic Chinese lung in a gold medallion.

In addition to the embossed golden Chinese dragon medallion on the cover of the 1970 Pekinian, the same image appears as a drawing on the title page.

The only time after 1972 that the Pekin dragon appeared on the yearbook cover during the 1970s was in 1975, when a photograph of the school’s logo painted on the side of one of the high school buildings was featured.

The 1981 Pekinian was the first PCHS yearbook after the school mascot was changed from “the Chink” to “the Dragon.” The yearbook cover sported a photograph of the new mascot.

During the 1980s and 1990s, the Pekin dragon usually was drawn in a more cartoonish style, with no recognizable association with Chinese culture, as he is on the cover of the 1990 Pekinian.

Pekin’s dragon again appears in his old Chinese style on the cover of the 1995 Pekinian.

The 1998 Pekinian — the yearbook for the last year students attended West Campus — does not feature a dragon on the cover, but on the table of contents page a winged dragon silhouette leaves footprints and points ahead to the future as he “moves on” to the expanded East Campus facilities.

Naught but the Pekin dragon’s formidable claws appears on the cover of the 2000 Pekinian.

A fire-breathing red dragon appears on one of the pages of the 2010 Pekinian.

The Pekin dragon again shows signs of his Chinese-themed origin in the 2011 Pekinian.

The PCHS official dragon logo and old school motto appears on a page of the 2011 Pekinian.

On the cover of the 2012 Pekinian, the Pekin dragon appears as a European-style fire drake breathing multi-colored flames.

The cover of the 2017 Pekinian features a fiery European-style dragon rather than a classic Chinese “lung.”

Advertisements

#beijing, #pekin-chink-mascot, #pekin-dragon, #pekin-high-schools, #pekin-history, #pekins-racist-reputation, #pekinian-yearbooks, #racism

Library’s Pekinian yearbooks go digital

By Jared Olar
Library assistant

The Pekin Public Library’s Pekin Community High School yearbooks are among the areas of the library’s Local History Room collection that get the most use, whether it’s someone looking up old friends or researching family history, or simply reminiscing about old times. The Pekinians are invaluable sources of information about Pekin high school history.

For many years, the library’s “Pekinian” yearbook collection has been available for patrons to peruse or for photocopying yearbook pages or student pictures. With the passage of time, however, inevitably the older volumes suffer wear and tear.

With the goal of reducing wear to our yearbooks and protecting them from damage in order to preserve them for the future, the Pekin Public Library has had its Pekinians for the years from 1908 to 2014 scanned and digitized by OCI Records Conversion in Oklahoma.

Each yearbook from 1908 to 2014 has been scanned from cover to cover, and the scanned images have been burned to individual disks. These scanned images were then uploaded to a portable external hard drive that library patrons may use in Adult Services.

Those who would like to make copies of images from the digitized yearbooks can ask to borrow the external drive. Library staff can show patrons how to plug the external drive into one of the library’s public computers in the Adult Computer Lab, and then assist them if the patrons need help with printing off images or saving copies of pages to a personal flash drive.

The original Pekinians will remain in the locked Local History Room cabinet, and the more recent yearbooks that have not yet been digitized will still be available there. Just ask a librarian to get them out for you.

The growth of Pekin over the past century or so may be seen in this comparison of the senior class photographs from the very first Pekinian in 1908 with those of the 2014 Pekinian. In 1908, the entire senior class fit on a single page, but in 2014 the first page of senior photos only goes from Adams to Beasley.

#1908-pekinian, #2014-pekinian, #digitized-yearbooks, #pekin-community-high-school, #pekin-high-schools, #pekin-history, #pekinian-yearbooks

Pekin’s annual Homecoming traditions

By Jared Olar
Library assistant

Bonfires, parades, dances, and football. Homecoming is a well-loved annual high school tradition, but a survey of Pekin high school yearbooks indicates that it’s a tradition that isn’t even 100 years old locally. With the growing popularity of high school football in the early 20th century, however, it was only a matter of time before celebrations designed to stoke school spirit would become a regular feature of the football season.

We can begin our survey in 1910 – in the days before shoulder pads and football helmets. As is the case with the other early Pekinian yearbooks, the 1911 Pekinian’s account of the 1910 football season never uses the term “homecoming” and makes no mention of any homecoming celebrations or traditions. However, it does describe the game that would have been Pekin’s homecoming, using language suggesting the team and school saw that game as special or important.

“The boys were put through a hard practice during the next week in anticipation of a game with Lincoln on the home grounds. The Lincoln team had been considerably strengthened since the first game and expected to wipe out their defeat. However, the Pekin eleven, with the defeat of the previous Saturday fresh in their minds, went into the game to win, and so desperately did they play that when the whistle blew the score stood – Pekin 47, Lincoln 0.”

It’s only in the 1930s that we begin to find references to recognizable homecoming traditions in the yearbook. For example, although the 1934 Pekinian still doesn’t use the term “homecoming,” we do find a reference to a night-before-the-game bonfire in this paragraph in the account of the 1933 football season:

“Everyone was stirred over the Urbana loss and looked forward to the Lincoln game. Big signs appeared around the school. ‘Beat Lincoln’ was the cry. The night before the game a pep meeting was held on James’ Field around a roaring bonfire.”

By 1950, Homecoming was well established as an annual school tradition. In the 1951 Pekinian, we read, “A week later Streator, a Big 12 powerhouse, gunning for a share of the conference crowd, sneaked by the Chinks 27-22 on a last minute tally. The Bulldog win transformed a joyous Homecoming crown (sic – crowd) into a sea of glum faces, as Pekin suffered its second and final Big 12 loss.”

It was a very different story the following year, 1951, though, when Pekin’s football team enjoyed its first undefeated season since 1926.

Three decades later, the high school yearbook told of a homecoming game with a very different outcome than in 1950. In fact, in addition to the narrative of the 1981 football season, the 1982 Pekinian devoted a two-page spread to the pre-game homecoming festivities and game, including a full-page photo of the traditional homecoming bonfire.

Under the headline, “Homecoming Win First In 11 Years,” the yearbook tells of the traditional celebrations that year, with the theme of “Nights On Broadway.”

“The Homecoming festivities began with coronation of the new royalty. Queen Beth White and King Bjorn Gustaffson crowned by 1980 Homecoming Queen, Lori Christensen. The court included Melanie Perrin and Mike Hill, Karen Miller and Randy Leitner, Debbie Peters and Dan Tosi and Teresa Fulk and Toni Bianchi.

The festivities included skits put on by the senior, junior, and sophomore classes (“First place went to the juniors who amused the audience with their adaption (sic) of ‘East Side Story’.”), followed by an “Almost Anything Goes” games competition won by the sophomores. After the games was the traditional bonfire. The homecoming parade featured a procession of Corvettes, the traditional “fire truck adorned with the football players and cheerleaders,” and German Club’s first-place parade float, “Knights On Broadway.”

“Highlight of the Homecoming festivities came Friday night,” the yearbook says. “The Dragons topped East Peoria with an overtime victory of 21-20. This was Pekin’s first Homecoming win in eleven years!”

The 1982 Pekinian headlined its account the 1981 football season with the words, “4-5 – Best Dragon Season Since ’77,” noting the great improvement “over the previous year’s 0-9.”

“East Peoria then came to Pekin’s homecoming,” the yearbook says. “At the end of the fourth quarter the score was 14-14. [Brian] Benassi scored and [Jorge] Garza kicked both times. In overtime, both teams scored a touchdown. However, Pekin edged them 21-20. It was Pekin’s first homecoming victory in eleven years.” It was also the team’s first homecoming victory under the new name of “the Dragons.”

Shown below is a slideshow of images from Pekin’s high school football history. The Local History Room is also currently displaying an exhibit of items from Pekin High School’s football history.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

#homecoming, #pekin-football, #pekinian-yearbooks